OZeWAI national accessibility conference coming to Perth in February 2020

OZeWAI, Australia’s national digital accessibility conference, has announced that it will be holding its next gathering in Perth, Western Australia and co-locating with the Perth Web Accessibility Camp (PWAC). The camp will be held 11-13 February 2020.

In an e-mail announcement, it was stated that:

“OzeWAI is partnering with the Perth Web Accessibility Camp (PWAC) to host the Australian Accessibility Conference. Our conference aim is to enhance the professional understanding of accessibility across Australia through networking, education and industry certification.

Participants will have the opportunity to:

  • Learn about and contribute to the future direction of accessibility.
  • Collaborate in the accessibility ‘Shark Tank’
  • Undertake internationally recognised industry certification exams
  • Celebrate achievements in accessibility”

The OZeWAI conference has been running for over 20 years with this marking its first time being held in Perth. By co-locating with the seventh Perth Web Accessibility Camp the move ensures that attendees will be supported whether they are just starting out on the accessibility journey or are seasoned digital access professionals.

Additional information can be found on the OZeWAI website You can also view a selection of PWAC 2019 highlights

Australian Accessibility Conference in 2020 in Perth, Western Australia.

Australian Accessibility Conference (OZeWAI and PWAC)
11th – 13th February 2020 at VisAbility at Victoria Park.

Australian Accessibility Conference

OZeWAI is the Australian Web Accessibility Initiative and PWAC is the Perth Web Accessibility Camp, these two events have joined together with the Centre for Accessibility to create the Australian Accessibility Conference.

Perth Web Accessibility Camp 2019

All had a great day and learned something useful to their work. The team has started adding photos and presentation slides to the website if you’d like to check them out.

The 2019 Perth Web Accessibility Camp was held on 12 February at VisAbility and a fantastic day was had by all. With over 100 people in attendance and a great diversity of presentations, it was a great opportunity to talk about digital access from a variety of perspectives. Here’s a selection of Dr Scott Hollier’s personal highlights from the Camp.

Highlights from Dr Scott Hollier

Seeing AI app from Microsoft

The Seeing AI app uses artificial intelligence and the camera on an iPhone, optimized for use with VoiceOver, to perform a number of useful functions:

  • Short Text – Speaks text as soon as it appears in front of the camera.
  • Documents – Provides audio guidance to capture a printed page, and recognizes the text, along with its original formatting.
  • Products – Scans barcodes, using audio beeps to guide you; hear the name, and package information when available.
  • People – Saves people’s faces so you can recognize them, and get an estimate of their age, gender, and emotions.
  • Scenes (early preview) – Hear an overall description of the scene captured.
  • Images in other apps – Just tap “Share” and “Recognize with Seeing AI” to describe images from Mail, Photos, Twitter, and more.

Seeing IA YouTube clip

Vision and Hearing Impaired Access for A History of the World in 100 Objects

media release

Monday 10 October, 2016

Vision and Hearing Impaired Access for A History of the World in 100 Objects

National Museum Offers Suite of Disability Access Features for the First Time

For the first time in a major exhibition, the National Museum of Australia is offering a suite of special features for blind, vision and hearing-impaired visitors to the “A History of the World in 100 Objects” exhibition from the British Museum.

Specially commissioned audio tours, with Auslan (Australian Sign Language) / Conexu video, braille label text and a Touch Table have been developed by the National Museum to help blind, vision and hearing-impaired visitors get the most out of A History of the World in 100 Objects.

In its only east coast venue, A History of the World in 100 Objects uses items from around the globe to explore the last two million years of human history, sourcing the oldest objects from the British Museum’s collection and incorporating those from the present day.

From stone to gold, clay to plastic, the exhibition traces human experience through objects people have made, including a 1.6 metre tall Assyrian relief, the famous Assyrian clay Flood Tablet (from modern Iraq) inscribed with the story of a great flood and an Ark; and a small, but exquisite, gold llama from Peru.

National Museum director Dr Mathew Trinca said he was committed to greater disability access at the cultural institution.

“The National Museum is keen to ensure that blind, vision and hearing-impaired visitors can enjoy exhibitions like A History of the World in 100 Objects, alongside other Australians,” said Dr Trinca.

National Museum Diversity and Wellbeing Support Officer (who is himself vision-impaired), Scott Grimley, said, “As technology makes it easier for people with a disability to access the world around them, the Museum is showing a commitment to include everyone in the exhibitions it provides.”

The National Museum is offering two audio tours, which are linked to Apps that can be downloaded on IPhones and Android devices.
Once downloaded, these Apps offer an Auslan video tour and audio descriptions of 19 objects featured in A History of the World in 100 Objects.

The 19 objects have Braille and large print identification numbers that can be accessed by blind, vision and hearing impaired visitors and then typed into the handheld devices, to trigger the audio or video tours.

Replica objects, including the Flood Tablet, several different Lewis Chessmen, the Astrolabe and the bust of Sophocles, that duplicate the sensory experience of touching the original objects in the exhibition, are available on a Touch Table.

www.nma.gov.au
Free general entry | Open 9 am —- 5 pm daily (closed Christmas Day) | Acton Peninsula Canberra | Freecall 1800 026 132
Donations (tax deductible) are welcome, visit www.nma.gov.au/support_us

The National Museum of Australia is an Australian Government Agency For more information please contact Tracy Sutherland, (02) 6208 5338 / 0438 620 710 or media@nma.gov.au